MSNR Step 2 – Getting Ready for Development

This isn’t really a step in the MSNR process but more notes for myself in the future so when I build another server I know what to do and not have to do everything over again from scratch.

Well your not gonna stand in front of your server all day while you code are you?  Well I’m not (not that dedicated).  Today I want to cover the basics of getting openSSH installed, configured and connecting to your files over SFTP.

I’m on windows so it was actually a bit of an ordeal the first time.

  1. If you don’t have it go download Putty.
  2. Next, generate an SSH Key:
    • Open the PuTTYgen program.
    • For Type of key to generate, select SSH-2 RSA.
    • Click the Generate button.
    • Move your mouse in the area below the progress bar. When the progress bar is full, PuTTYgen generates your key pair.
    • Type a passphrase in the Key passphrase field.
    • Type the same passphrase in the Confirm passphrase field. You can use a key without a passphrase, but this is not recommended.
    • Save your private key.
    • Select your public key and paste it into a new text file
      • You can use the saved one on openSSH Putty will format it wrong
  3. Now that you got your keys comes the fun part get the public key on your server.
    • Copy your text file with the pasted key on to a jump drive.
    • Plug that into your server
    • Once you plug it in you’ll notice that Ubuntu recognized it and probably set it to something like [sda]
    • Now for the commands

Now you should be able to create your connection to your server.  Open up Putty type in the IP of your server then go to the Connection >> SSH >> Auth and put the location of your Private key that you saved earlier in the “Private key file for authentication:” field.

There you are SSH done.  Finally to connect to your folder via SFTP (I use Filezilla).  First load your private key file into Filezilla and open up Edit >> Settings.  Now go to the SFTP section and add your private key file again.  If you used a passphrase you’ll have to enter it in and save another version of your keyfile with out a passphrase.  Add the keyfile and create your new connection.  Use your username and the IP and you should be good to go.

Happy coding.

The MSNR Stack Step 1

I’ve been letting the idea for the MSNR stack ruminate in my mind for a while now and it was finally time to pull the trigger.  There are an endless array of node frameworks sprouting up but at the end of the day I think its important to do what your comfortable with and for me that’s MVC and SPAs that don’t step it your MVC aka the MSNR stack.

Today I took a very important step toward that goal by setting up my first very own server!  Well it’s not the first time I’ve set up a server or anything but it’s the first time I’ve done it outside of a VM!  I purchased an old HP G5 DL380 recently and decided it was high time to get it up and running.

The first thing I did was mount the sucker:

Then I wired it up, got it some juice (power) and some food (internet) switched it on and it was like the jet of my dreams taking off in my basement.  (The fans are really loud on start up…)

After that I installed Ubuntu 12 LTS since it was certified for my hardware.  Once the install was done it was time to get node installed.  I used a package available here from joyent with great success.

Then I had to make sure it would actually show something if I navigated to it.  By default node does not serve anything like nginx or lamp.  You need to create an application in order for something to display enter the Hello World app:

I’m a fan of nano so I did :

Then I got to work writing my first app (which I stole from the node site).

Once it was all ready I did my CTRL+X  Y and Enter to save my file.  Then finally it was time to test!

At this point if you did everything right all you should see is a flashing underscore.  You’ll need to use sudo if you are using port 80 like I am.

Finally I wanted to see my master piece in action so I logged on to my domain registrar, created a new subdomain, went to the Advanced DNS editor and redirected the sub-domain to my IP address.  Once that was setteled I went into my At&T 2WIRE router and went into my firewall, selected my server and set it to accept traffic on port 80 (by clicking the Server link and the Web Server selection).

TLDR for all those who skip to the bottom (like myself).

  1. Get a server
  2. Install Ubuntu
  3. Install Node
  4. Create a Node App
  5. Point a Domain to your IP Address
  6. Ensure your Router/Firewall are ready for the traffic.

DONE

http://dev.motoandmustache.com/

Not too bad for an evenings work.

Visibility in Lists with a Simple Script

For those occasions where you find yourself creating complex objects that are lists where you need control visibility here is a simple script that will save you a lot of headache.

I came across this needing while working with a list of locations on a project.  The objects were to complex for a table and needed to be dynamic enough to allow end users to easily add additional locations.  What I did was create a Section and bind it to my location list.  Then I proceed to put my various sub fields and sub-objects into that section.  Then at the bottom I put a couple of buttons that fired boundary events to add and delete items to my list.  Simple right?

repeater

Continue reading…

Installing and configuring IBM Business Process Manager on Windows 2012 R2 for Development

Starting my new job at Blue 2.0 and my supervisor gave me a little challenge… to get BPM installed.  Turns out it’s a little bit of a process and I’ve already had to start over once so I thought I’d document my process here.  I’ve decided to use Windows 2012 R2 as my development environment, I’d expect that most IT departments (that are windows based) are going to want to use the newest version of Windows Server so I figure why not make my development environment match a common deployment environment (I’d be interested to see the deployment numbers for base OS for this technology but that’s another day).  You can get a free 180 day evaluation copy of 2012 here: http://www.microsoft.com/en-us/evalcenter/evaluate-windows-server-2012-r2-essentials?i=1.  I’m using the Essentials package so I don’t have to configure absolutely everything.  I’ve installed the server on my VirtualBox VM already and gone through the initial config.  For this virtual box you’ll need at least 40GB of HD space.

Continue reading…

The MSNR Stack

MongoDB + Sails.js + Node.js + React.js = MSNR (mis · ner)

JavaScript frameworks are coming out of the woodwork right now but picking and choosing  which ones to use for your project can be a pain, because there are a myriad of ways to combine these frameworks to build applications.  ToDoMVC covers some of the more popular combinations out right now, however there is one that they don’t cover. The MSNR stack.

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ISIS Suburban Mall Stores

Thank you internet for making me smile.  Recently trending on twitter is the hashtag #ISISSuburbanMallStores I’ve saved some of my favorites for later giggles:

  • The GoatCheesecake Factory
  • Behead, Baath, and Beyond
  • Death to America Eagle Outfitters
  • Bombs and Noble
  • Cold Stoning
  • Things Dismembered
  • Die Yankee Candle
  • Aunt Annie’s Burkha-Covered Pretzels
  • IED Crafters
  • Jihad Juice
  • Turban Outfitters
  • The Hamas Depot
  • The Sharper Papyrus Drawing
  • Men-Only Warehouse
  • F.Y.E. (For Your Execution)
  • Behead a Bear Workshop

My contribution…

Victoria’s Veils

The state of U.S. – 2014

I generally don’t write about politics on my blog but I wanted to look at some things I found interesting to help me make my my decisions this election season.  I believe finding out what is important what is important to me then looking at how the candidates line up is a good way to select a candidate.  To be honest I’ve gotten tired of all the rhetoric from all the bought and paid for journalists in this country who’s opinions and articles are about as useful to society as the stuff you flush after a good morning poop (I mean… yeah a good poop can make you feel better but it’s still shit).

Anyway…

TLDR(To Long Didn’t Read)

Issues/Attributes in order of Importance to Me

  1. Income inequality
  2. Reducing government spending on federal pensions
  3. Political compromise
  4. Welfare program reform
  5. Make Higher education affordable
  6. Not overly religious
  7. Pro equality (Gender & Marriage & Racial) – with out over compensating
  8. Government corruption
  9. – The economy (Negative points for even mentioning it)

To find out why I’ve organized them like this continue on.   I list links to various statistics then I analyze them below.

Continue reading…

3 Reasons not to use SimpleSAMLphp to provide SSO support to your PHP application.

First off I want to say that I’m sure that SimpleSAMLphp has some really great applications/uses.  As they say on their site they’ve won some awards.   However in my experience this application has several large drawbacks that prevent it from being usable for many projects.

  1. Installation?
    • If I’m going to do something with simpleSAMLphp like write an extension for a CMS or add it for use in an application that I want to wrap up for easy deployment I ABSOLUTELY DO NOT want to require people to install SimpleSAMLphp on their own to use my software.
    • This isn’t cross platform friendly (at least not in the documentation) a.k.a. no windows install instructions.
    • Granted if you download it and put it in your application you can access the pages (in module core) but that leads to…
  2. Not external database friendly.
    • Trying to make the config files dynamic is like pulling teeth.  If you try to require() anything it more than likely won’t function correctly.  I tested several scripts to parse external data from my database to set the parameters in config.php file but every-time I tried to load the  ‘/www/module.php/core/frontpage_welcome.php’ my database object would fail.
    • What is the point of forcing your end users to manually configure a php file when this should be done from the application we are trying to build for them.
  3.  It’s bulky.
    • 1289 files
    • 462 folders
    • 6.77 MB (after unzip)
    • Integrating SAML into an application should not be this expensive…

I hope that they find a way to release a “lite” version of this application that make it more accessible to other application projects.

For now I would recommended looking at PHP SAML by OneLogin.  No installation required,  its much lighter and looks like it’s much easier to integrate with applications.  I’ll let you know my development with this one goes.